Nursing student named national fellow

Emerald Hagerty, a nursing student at Ivy Tech Community College Northeast, has been named a Newman Civic Fellow by Campus Compact. The award “honors inspiring college student leaders who have demonstrated an investment in finding solutions for challenges facing communities throughout the country,” according to the Campus Compact website. It looks for students who use their college experiences to better understand both the causes of social issues and effective ways to create change.

Ivy Tech Northeast Chancellor Jerrilee K. Mosier and Student Life Director Christina O’Brien nominated Hagerty in part because of her work in getting a student-run food pantry started on campus.

“This fellowship isn’t about volunteerism only but about finding longer-term solutions and improving communities,” O’Brien says. “With her work on the food pantry, that bigger effort to address a community need, giving something for others to grow upon is so important.”

Hagerty

Hagerty

Hagerty has been an active member of the College’s Student Government Association and Campus Activities Board for two years. Last summer, she was selected to participate in the alternative summer break student project, which focused on hunger. During the week-long project, she worked with food banks, soup kitchens, and community gardens in and around Indianapolis. Her experience in the project is what led Hagerty to work with O’Brien to start the College’s food pantry through student government.

“I will be honest: I am very much a white, middle-class female who has never faced hunger,” she says. “But the whole experience moved me. We are currently focused on fundraising so this pantry will be around long after we have all graduated. We hope to do more than just the pantry. I would love for the full kitchen be used at the (Public Safety Academy: Ivy Tech) South Campus and community meals offered a few times a week.”

Hagerty has attended Ivy Tech Northeast since fall 2013, originally studying Health Information Technology. She plans to graduate in spring 2017 and hopes to one day become a family nurse practitioner. She is from Fort Wayne and has a husband and two children, and she says she was surprised to learn she was nominated for the award.

“I feel like I’m a normal mom and student who saw a need and worked with other student leaders and administration to make it happen,” Hagerty says. “My hope is this food pantry will allow at least one student who might have struggled at Ivy Tech to stay and graduate, without worrying about something as simple as food.”

Campus Compact is a Boston-based national organization that works to deepen public colleges’ and universities’’ abilities to improve community life and education students about social and civic responsibility.

Ivy Tech Northeast nursing program runs in the family

Meet Trisha Kilgore.

DSC_0015Trisha is a nursing student at Ivy Tech Community College Northeast. She’s caring, headstrong, and a lover of vampire shows and “The Walking Dead.”

Ivy Tech has been pretty important to Trisha’s family throughout her life. Twenty-two years ago, Trisha’s mother  graduated from the college’s licensed practical nursing program. Her sister graduated from the registered nursing program seven years ago, as did her husband in 2011.

When Trisha graduates — in August, she hopes — she and her husband plan to work in Fort Wayne for about a year before becoming traveling nurses. Their five children — he has two, she has three — are grown and out of the house, so the time will allow them to use their degrees and to travel.

“You take 12-, 13-week assignments in different areas around the country,” she says. “The recruiter we talked to said there’s hundreds of different cities she could place us in.”

Trisha’s the kind of student we want to celebrate on Green Light, Ivy Tech Northeast’s new blog. We want to share students’ stories and the stories that come out of some of our awesome classes. (Like nursing. Just look at the toys — ahem, serious medical equipment — Trisha gets to play with.)

This fellow wears a wristband that IDs him as Bronson, Kenneth. Teachers can make him talk to nursing students as they diagnose his maladies.

This fellow wears a wristband that IDs him as Bronson, Kenneth. Teachers can make him talk to nursing students as they diagnose his maladies.

Trisha admits she's not sure what this is for. School of Nursing Dean Jewel Diller says XXXX????

School of Nursing Dean Jewel Diller says these are IV start hands — students can practice insterting IVs with them.

These arms had the skin stripped off so they could be cleaned. Those grooves allow students to practice inserting an IV.

These arms had the skin stripped off so they could be cleaned. Those grooves allow students to practice inserting an IV.

We’ll be posting stories on Fridays to make you smile, to make you think, or just to give you a happy little boost before the weekend. (Or, you know, to creep you out by showing you fake skinless arms.)

Don’t want to miss a post? Check out that grey box in the upper right hand corner of this page where you can sign up to receive Green Light posts straight in your inbox.

If you know of any students or Ivy Tech Northeast stories that deserve a post like Trisha’s, I’d love to hear about it. Leave a comment on this post with a way to get in touch with you, or you can email me at jgarver2@ivytech.edu.

Thanks for stopping by!